Culture and Organizational Change

Just a small observation I made during AWS Transformation Day. While the entire theme for the event was on transforming business, the schedule had one track for “Culture and Organizational Change” alone. While Culture and Organizational Change is a broad and huge topic, but it is necessary and makes the difference for agility in rapidly changing and competitive markets. Amazon has been talking about this for years and they share their knowledge with their partners.

On an attempt to find out how organizations actually master this, the perspective most consultants and companies I talked to during the event shared with me was rather sobering. Anyone exhibiting at that event merely offered to run any software project under an agile management. No support, consultancy or even efforts to drive actual change, whatsoever, at least nothing that would exceed a traditional software project scope.

Cultural and Organizational Change is something requiring executive buy in and is killed quickly by means of exhaustive efforts to plan ahead. Culture needs to embrace the possibility to change quickly, throughout the process. And the wish for management is human, to have transparency and perspective early in the process, it is just as natural in the process for developers to stay vague for items that are not yet clear.

Any cultural change needs to embrace bi-directual communication and the ability to break down complex. On first thought this sounds easy, but requires plenty of cooperation and trust in a clearly defined team. Culture is rooted in clear understanding of roles, responsibilities and not to mention last, trust of all members.

Net Defender CloudFlare Goes Down, Taking Many Websites With It

The Internet was built with de-centralized infrastructures in mind. To scale globally, network providers like CloudFlare have emerged, to run decentralized infrastructures and offer them as a service. In general, keeping service independent of each others and maintaining heterogeneous networks have a proven track record of resilience, that is not necessarily inherent to the architecture of these providers. Just like Akamai had a bad day in 2004, CloudFlare today suffered from a global outage, that left many obvious collateral problems visible all over the Internet. Bloomberg, among others, reports:

CloudFlare Inc., an internet service meant to protect websites from going down, faced its own network issues on Tuesday, leading to several prominent sites — like blogging platform Medium and video game chat provider Discord — being unavailable for some time.

Source: Net Defender CloudFlare Goes Down, Taking Many Websites With It – Bloomberg

The colors of future

Sabine Hossenfelder googled images for ‘futuristic’ and found something puzzling. A quick experiment verified her finding. So it seems the future will not be bright but something in black and blue. Somebody really needs to figure out and in particular why the past is more orange.

Math.Round opens printing dialog.

The official bug of the day makes https://try.dot.net open a printing dialog, just by using Math.Round. Here’s the github issue: https://github.com/dotnet/try/issues/290

Responses on Twitter are totally appropriate.

Salesforce buys Tableau

Salesforce buys Tableau for an amount of $15.7B, in not only its largest M&A deal to date, but probably one of the largest deals ever. After Google only acquired Looker earlier past week, it seems the race for Business Analytics is on.

SaaS giant Salesforce announced that it has signed an agreement with Seattle-based data visualization and analysis platform Tableau for $15.7 billion in stock. Both companies’ boards of directors approved the deal, which “is expected to be completed during Salesforce’s fiscal third quarter […]

Source: Salesforce To Buy Tableau For $15.7B In Its Largest M&A Deal To Date

Prioritize Opportunities, Not Solutions

I cringe every time I see product teams use a spreadsheet to rank the ideas in their backlog based on some made-up math formula usually consisting of things like business value, user value, and technical difficulty. While this exercise is pervasive, it misses the point entirely. Our job is not to prioritize solutions. A product […]

Source: Prioritize Opportunities, Not Solutions | Product Talk