The Y2038 Problem

The Y2038 problem is similar to the Y2K problem. We’re exactly in between both about now. Both are 18 years away, in either direction. While Y2K is over and was obvious to everyone, Y2038 is not.

The issue here relates to a representation of date and time in Unix systems, and is therefore sometimes referred to as Unix Y2K. The root is the convention to store date and time information as 32bit unsigned integer in such systems. This means, possible values are limited. Time-differences in seconds, starting from 01.Jan 1970 cannot span beyond 03:14:07 UTC on 19 January 2038.

The Y2038 Problem
Calendar

The Y2038 problem will make all calculations beyond this date impossible, until migrated to another representation. At the time being, this seems far away. However, the problem casts its shadows already. Industries, in particular financial markets, often rely on long term forecasts.

Governance issued treasury bonds come with with the longest maturity. Often twenty years, sometimes thirty years. Calculations for complex, long running financing models easily try to estimate returns 20 years and beyond into the future. This is already beyond the problematic date that Y2038 brings. The code to run these calculations is typically complex and stable. Sometimes, it is as old as from 1970. Back then, this date-representation Unix engineers introduced this approach. 32bit covered a long period. John Femellia has a thread, over at Twitter, telling a story about the upcoming issues today.

This week in dystopia.

This week in dystopia: The New York Times has an article about the next steps in dystopian future. A start-up evolving face recognition algorithms, fed by a database with facial images, scraped from the open web.

Clearview - This week in Dystopia.
Clearview – This week in Dystopia.

A little-known start-up helps law enforcement match photos of unknown people to their online images — and “might lead to a dystopian future or something,” a backer says.

The New York Times: The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It

Further, the article describes the sheer size of the database. At a rate of massive duplicate numbers, three billion images is still impressive.

The system — whose backbone is a database of more than three billion images that Clearview claims to have scraped from Facebook, YouTube, Venmo and millions of other websites — goes far beyond anything ever constructed by the United States government or Silicon Valley giants.

The New York Times: The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It

In times in which criticism of big tech is on the rise. Just this week Jannis Brühl, Head of Tech News Department at @sueddeutsche Zeitung published an opinion that this technology is dangerous and should be banned,. The article include an appeal to German government to create legislation to do so. Jannis is in good company with other tech critics like Eyvgen Morozov

Source: The Secretive Company That Might End Privacy as We Know It

The right perspective

The right perspective: Perspective is important. For Product Managers in particular!

Team Product Ownership

Team Product Ownership is a desirable property for any scrum team. Age of Product shares a few thoughts on how to encourage teams to think about customers and the product more.

Learn how to encourage product ownership with an initial day-long product mindset workshop for your Scrum team — Age-of-Product.com. #Mindset #Productdesign #Productdiscovery

Source: Age of Product

Product Owner vs. Product Manager

Product Owner vs. Product Manager: Product Management is a challenging role and requires diverse skills. Large organisation often introduce a split between two similar, close roles – Product Ownership and Product Management. Both requires a large set of skills.

Jordan Bergtraum, The Product Mentor, a mentor at The Product Guy, leads a conversation on this split.

Source: The Product Guy.