Bella Ciao Ismir

Hacker hacken… Türkische Moscheen und deren Minarette, um auf den Lautsprechern der Einrichtungen “Bella Ciao” anstelle der üblichen Gebete zu spielen.

Dem Nachrichtensender N-TV zu Folge ein Angriff von türkischen Hackern.

Health Officials Say ‘No Thanks’ to Contact-Tracing Tech“, titles Wired. In all these recent debates about how to handle Covid-19 going forward, in particular in Germany, it may be worthwhile looking beyond borders.

Later last month, Engadget reported, that Israel stops phone tracing to enforce Corona quaranties. While Israel seemed to look at phone location information, the Wired article suggests multiple US states and cities evaluated the benefit of other contact tracing technology. The result seems to disappoint:

States like New York, California, and Massachusetts, and cities like Baltimore and San Francisco, have looked carefully at cutting-edge contact-tracing solutions and largely said, “No thanks,” or “Not now.”

via wired.

Foreign perspective is an interesting one, too. Foreign Policy titles “Germany’s Angst Is Killing Its Coronavirus Tracing App“. Which, after all, may be the exact outcome.

Corona

Peter Schaar
Peter Schaar beim 30. Chaos Communication Congress in Hamburg, 2013, Bild: Wikipedia / Tobias Klenze / CC-BY-SA 4.0.

Kurze Durchsage von Peter Schaar zur Telefonortung wegen Corona: Handy-Ortung war demzufolge keine Idee der wissenschaftlichen Beratungskommission für die Corona-Pandemie. Es war die gesellschaftliche Situation, die es der Politik ermöglicht hat, einen lang gehegten Wunsch umzusetzen. Peter Schaar war übrigens von 2003 bis 2013 Bundesbeauftragter für den Datenschutz und die Informationsfreiheit (BfDI).

Update: Ulrich Kelber, der amtierende Bundesdatenschutzbeauftragte, sieht das wohl ähnlich.

Joeseph Redmon, who invented the YOLO Algorithm, quit his research over ethical concerns. These are some dark shadows this is throwing ahead.

‘We’ve created a privacy industry’

‘We’ve created a privacy industry’ was a statement you could often hear when Europe introduced General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and the German implementation DatenSchutz GrundVerOrdnung (DSGVO). Already back in 2016 first predictions arrived, that GDPR will boost European software industry and give them a unique selling point. After the regulation became effective in Europe May 25th 2018(!), after a 2 years transition period, perceived only complaints happened. Affected data controllers and processors cited the difficulties implementing these regulations. A BitKom funded survey even indicates the regulation is hurting the European market.

'We've created a privacy industry'
Panel on Internet Security and Privacy

Now, around 1.5years later, the industry seems to have settled on the regulation and business continues as usual. Subjectively perceived, privacy is indeed still an obstacle to decision makers in the market. Even politicians keep on imploring data to be the new oil, demanding a data driven economy and to weakend the underlying ideas of european data protection acts. Meanwhile, the opportunity has moved along. Californian Start-Ups discovered this niche and turn privacy it into value:

Privacy-focused technology companies are offering a variety of services, from personal data scrubbing to business-focused software meant to help companies comply with the law.

Source: ‘We’ve created a privacy industry’: California law fuels wave of startups