Reading recommendations

When a dear friend asked for my reading list today, I didn’t have a proper answer beyond all of what is on my nightstand. There are still „5000 Jahre Schulden“ (David Graeber), „Machine, Platform, Crowd“ (Andrew McAfee  (Autor), Erik Brynjolfsson (Autor)), „The Heretic’s Guide to Global Finance: Hacking the Future of Money“ (Brett Scott) and „Die drei Sonnen“ (Cixin Liu) left, but the list is empty beyond that.

While I spent my time split in half between the weekend newspaper and a lake, I did some very quick research and came across Wired‘s 13 reading recommendations for this fall, that all seem to be worth a closer look.

Amazon could write books.

Today in dystopian news: Amazon, the book selling department, controlling about 40% of the US book market, collects reading habbits from their sales and Kindle. By now the corporation knows enough about it’s customers it could be generating best selling books. Spookey. And potentially game changing, when machines replace creative professions.

Amazon has the ability to track vast amounts of reader data and use it to change the landscape of American fiction.

Source: Amazon has so much data it could make algorithm-driven fiction — Quartz

Usborne releases its classic 1980s computer programming books

Learn programming with Usborne Publishing‘s 1983 “Introduction to Machine Code for Beginners“. The classic books have been released as PDF under the only restriction to link to their pages: Usborne’s computer and coding books.

The PDFs available include:

The release happened to promote the publishers new board book for small children to get started with computing: Lift-the-Flap Computers and Coding (affiliate link) and Coding for Beginners (affiliate link).

via: Boing Boing:

Jindo Fox writes, “A few years ago, Cory linked to some wonderful pictures in Usborne’s 1983 classic Introduction to Machine Code for Beginners. Usborne has made PDF copies available of…