Is anyone here using Azure?

Are you using Azure? A newly published Hyper-V bug could possibly crash ‘big portions of Azure cloud infrastructure’.

Security researchers have posted proof of concept code that exploits a recently patched vulnerability in Microsoft’s Hyper-V hypervisor. The bug enables code in the guest to crash the host, and in some circumstances compromise the host’s security.

The Register

Source: Hyper-V bug that could crash ‘big portions of Azure cloud infrastructure’: Code published

Math.Round opens printing dialog.

The official bug of the day makes https://try.dot.net open a printing dialog, just by using Math.Round. Here’s the github issue: https://github.com/dotnet/try/issues/290

Responses on Twitter are totally appropriate.

notepad.exe

Until recently, notepad.exe was considered safe in terms of security vulnerability, mostly for its lack of features and therefore lack of attack surface. Until Vulnerability researcher at Google, Tavis Ormandy, took a closer look and popped a shell from notepad.exe.

Awesome.

Google stored G Suite passwords in plaintext

In today’s edition of privacy related topics, it is Google that apparently stored customer passwords in plaintext. Google didn’t disclose which (enterprise) customers have been affected, but was clear that improper access is out of question. With this recent incident, Google joins ranks of Facebook, Instagram, but also Twitter and LinkedIn.

Google says it discovered a bug that caused some of its enterprise G Suite customers to have their passwords stored in an unhashed form for about 14 years.

Source: Google stored some G Suite passwords in plaintext for 14 years

Phones Open to Attack through WhatsApp Flaw

Meanwhile, another flaw from the Facebook universe. While it appears it’s not immediately related to data leakage, it gives great potential to 3rd parties, though. On the upside, nobody will attribute it to Facebook this time.

It’s a good opportunity to point out and recommend the alternatives to Whatsapp, in particular Signal and Threema.

A WhatsApp vulnerability left Android and iOS devices open to attack from sophisticated surveillance software. The Facebook-owned company said it hasn’t yet been able to determine how many people were impacted, and told users to ensure they’re running the latest version of the app.

Source: WhatsApp Flaw Left Phones Open to Attack From Sophisticated Spyware | Digital Trends