appfleet joins Cloudflare

appfleet is a Poland based company that develops and offers edge hosting of containerised apps. Edge computing is a trend that emerged a few years back and allows to bring applications closer to the end user, therefore reducing latency and improving user experience. Cloudflare, a player strong in this space, now acquired appfleet, augmenting it’s portfolio of workers with container capabilities. No details of the deal have been made public, however, we will see more of these type of acquisitions with the market starting to consolidate.

appfleet console

Summary: Due to a great synergy between our products, I am happy to announce that Cloudflare and appfleet are joining forces! The appfleet platform is shutting down, with all clusters going offline on October 31st 2021. Long story: When we started working on appfleet our goal was to build an

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Source: appfleet joins Cloudflare

Multiplayer Doom on Cloudflare Workers

“Does it run Doom?” is the ultimate nerd test for technology. CloudFlare passed today running multiplayer Doom on their edge worker network:

So, if a developer wants to run their next hit, say a real-time multiplayer game, using nothing but their app and Workers, without any servers or traditional infrastructure, can they? Let’s prove they can. Here’s Doom Multiplayer running on top of Cloudflare Workers.

Source: Multiplayer Doom on Cloudflare Workers

AWS announces CloudFront Functions

AWS Logo
AWS Logo

AWS announced general availability of “CloudFront Functions“. The product allows deploying lightweight functions on the edge of CloudFront’s CDN deployment, bringing logic close to the end user. After CloudFlare initiated a trend with their Workers, AWS is the third major cloud player to enter the space with this offering.

The purpose of such an architecture is to bring specific logic closer to the consumer, therefore delivering richer, more personalized content with lower latency. With a distribution across 225+ CloudFront edge locations in 90 cities across 47 countries the promise is huge.

To get developers kickstarted, AWS published a Github repo with examples. As one would expect, these are primarily revolving around http header manipulation and authentication. CloudFront Functions runs JavaScript.

Amazon CloudFront launches new Edge Locations
AWS Logo

Amazon CloudFront Edge Locations: AWS’ Amazon CloudFront launches 5 new CloudFront Edge Locations. These are located in Bulgaria, Greece, Hungary, Kenya, and Romania.

AWS CloudFront is a Content Delivery Network and helps webpages to distribute their content globally. To achieve this, CDN’s leverage managed reverse proxy servers. The goal is to bring content closer to the consumer. And through keeping bulky media distributed, it prevents congesting internet connections.

These added deployments will help AWS customers and their consumers experience significantly improved page load times. AWS has constantly expanded CloudFront’s Network footprint since its launch in 2008. With this recent update, CloudFront now has 216 points of presence in 84 cities across 42 countries. 

Source: aws blog.

The new Edge browser, built on the same open source code as Google Chrome, contains a new Tracking Prevention feature that blocks third-party trackers and, at the Strict setting, many ads. My tests show that one in four items blocked are from Google.

Source: Edge vs. Chrome: Microsoft’s Tracking Prevention hits Google the hardest

AWS: New edge locations in Osaka, Japan and Milan, Italy

Aus dem EMail-Announcement:

We’re excited to announce the launch of new edge locations in Osaka, Japan and Milan, Italy to serve Amazon CloudFront and Amazon Route 53.

With the launches in Osaka and Milan, our first edge location in Italy, Amazon CloudFront and Amazon Route 53 now have a total of 26 edge locations worldwide. Each new edge location helps lower latency and improves performance for your end users. These are the first two edge location launches of 2012 and we plan to continue to add new edge locations worldwide.

Mehr Info im Typepad-Blog: Amazon CloudFront: Looking Back, Looking Forward, Making Plans