Why Would You NEVER Apply Agile Software Development Processes?

A central statement in the Agile Manifesto is to put Individuals and interactions over processes and tools. Many development teams, in particular those with less experience, lack the self sufficiency to deal with this freedom. It’s probably not the exact answer to the question, but it makes Agile a lot more difficult.

Here is the original blog: Herding Cats: Why Would You NEVER Apply Agile Software Development Processes?

Django 3.0 alpha1 released

A major version bump, with the largest change being built in support for ASGI, the Asynchronous Server Gateway Interface, that previously could be included via channels.

The biggest benefits ASGI offers over the traditional WSGI, is the possibility to build asynchronous operations in webapps, and leverage e.g. WebSockets to push information to the client.

Here are the in-development release notes: Django 3.0 release notes – UNDER DEVELOPMENT | Django documentation

Wunderlist

In 2015, it was big news to the Startup and VC scene, when Microsoft announced it would acquire Wunderlist. Back then, 6Wunderkinder was one of the most promising StartUps in the German Capital. The social media bubble immediately started debating the future of the product and whether Microsoft would spoil it or even shut it down.

The recent past showed all fears held true when Microsoft announced the shutdown of Wunderlist in favour of a “To-Do” app, to the disappointment of it’s entire user base.

Now, another two years later, Christian Reber, CEO and Founder of 6 Wunderkinder, announced his plans to buy back the core application from Microsoft. VentureBeat has more

Doing the heavy lifting together

Running products in large organisations is a challenging task. Sebastian Lindemann of Product Coalition shares a few thoughts on high impact team cooperation modes.

How product teams can work together to maximize impact “Driving is easy if you are the only one the road“ … my driving instructor had many wise words to share. This one stuck with me as it is applies to so much more than driving a car.

Source: Doing the heavy lifting together

Product Team FAQ

Marty Cagan of the Silicon Valley Product Group published an article only yesterday, comparing Product and Feature Teams. Apparently, the article generated so much feedback that Marty found it worthwhile clarifying a few of his thoughts and collect the gist of the feedback he received.

Every so often one of my articles seems to strike a chord, and this latest one on the difference between Product Teams and Feature Teams certainly seemed to do that.  I am grateful for the very positive response.  This morning I woke up to well over a hundred people that took the time to e-mail […]

Source: Product Team FAQ | Silicon Valley Product Group

10 Munich-based startups

As one of the top technology hubs in Europe, Munich is an economic powerhouse, hosting the presence of international corporations, strong VC support, top universities and of course, the Oktoberfest. Many startups choose to make the city their headquarters each year – and here are 10 of the most promising Munich-based to watch in 2019.

Source: 10 Munich-based startups to look out for in 2019 and beyond

What We Can Learn from the Capital One Hack

Capital One

Earlier this week, it became public that Capital One was victim to a privacy leak, affecting more than 100 million of their customers. News revealed details about the source of the attack, that apparently an individual conducted and bragged about it publicly.

Now, a few days later and more facts known, the always excellent Krebs on Security blog offers some lessons learned from the incident. It has good statements from Netflix, CloudFlare, DisruptOS and AWS personnel, including citations about the involvement of IAM, EC2 and WAF. In particular, it points out mitigations that AWS recommends in response to Server Side Request Forgery (SSRF).

Interesting is the conclusion that Rich Mogull comes to, that the industry is facing a major gap in skills, related to this kind of cloud security. Basic skill and availability thereof has always been a major gap in the entire industry. Only with the arrival of cloud it becomes more sparse. Mostly, because corporations maintain both their existing data centers and new cloud infrastructure, leaving out on the opportunity to become more secure in the cloud.

Source: What We Can Learn from the Capital One Hack

Batman has a bad day.

Batman has a bad day.

We’ve all been there.

via.

Unlock your product organization’s potential by defining “done”

Simplifying and aligning conversations with a definition of done

All too often, the task list for your teams shared project management tool shows items like “Create Workflow” or “Define Process”. Items that do resonate well in the flow of work and in the nexus of individuals. But they do fall short of allowing the rest of the organization to grasp the meaning and even fail to do so for the reporter when some time has passed.

Some consice expressions on expectations on what this story or ticket is about can do wonder to getting things done. Rather than “defining a a workflow”, for example the product management team would

  • Check for Duplicate Entries
  • Describe the Requirement
  • Outline all depending products
  • Draw a critical path
  • Align all stakeholders on the critical path
  • Communicate to the team

The core idea is to eliminate any discussion about when an issue, item or story is delivered and is unique across function. Of course, the above serves as an example and will vary by team and work, and needs revision in any particular scenario. Having specific action advise will help reducing debates and focus on an actual deliverable, that is done by all opinion.

Source: Unlock your product organization’s potential by defining “done”

Big O Notation Cheat-Sheet

Quick Context: Big O Notation describes an execution limitation of a function, given an argument tends towards a particular value. In other words, smaller values describe better execution, typically in execution time.