Mozilla unveils YouTube recommendation horror stories

Somehow, a fun read. Still problematic, and somewhat scary, at the scale YouTube relies on recommendations.

YouTube Horror Stories
YouTube Horror Stories

Mozilla gathered 28 user-submitted stories, detailing incidents where YouTube’s recommendation served videos featuring racism, conspiracies, and violence.

Source: Mozilla unveils 28 horror stories about YouTube’s recommendation algorithm

LinkedIn Snaps Up Drawbridge

Drawbridge, a company that provides Marketing Tooling to understand customers better, is LinkedIn’s second known acquisition in 8 Months. The volume of the deal is unknown.

LinkedIn snaps up Drawbridge

LinkedIn just acquired its 22nd-known company: Drawbridge. The smaller company will integrate with LinkedIn’s marketing services. The move jumps off of LinkedIn’s own growth in providing marketing tooling, according to the company’s blog post. LinkedIn claims that its “Marketing Solutions” business “accelerated” […]

Source: LinkedIn Snaps Up Drawbridge, Its Second Known Acquisition In 8 Months

Salesforce outage.

It appears Salesforce was shutting down its services May 17th 2019. Reason was a faulty configuration of scripting options, that allowed users to access to all their company’s Salesforce data. To prevent worse, Salesforce shut down.

Salesforce said the script only impacted customers of Salesforce Pardot – a business-to-business (B2B) marketing-focused CRM.

However, out of an abundance of caution, the company decided to take down all other Salesforce services, for both current and former Pardot customers.

Source: Faulty database script brings Salesforce to its knees | ZDNet

Das Gewäsch von Volkswagen

Aussagekräftige Informationen – die gab es früher einmal. Heute versuchen Autohersteller, die Kunden mit emotionalen Geschichten für sich zu begeistern. Das allerdings könnte böse enden.

Auch die Software-Industrie appelliert schon länger an das Bauchgefühl des Kunden. Eine Strategie die schon seit längerem populär. Man kann das – positiv gestimmt – als erfolgreichen Marketing-Mechanismus interpretieren. Storytelling heißt der Marketing-Trend, wie selbst die Süddeutsche in dem Artikel schreibt, und ist mittlerweile in aller Munde.

Das ist auch notwendig, weil viele der Produkte, nicht nur im Automobilumfeld, besonders aber im High-Tech Umfeld, sich nicht durch Basiseigenschaften unterscheiden. Tatsächlich finden die Alleinstellungsmerkmale sich im allgemeinen in sehr technischen Details, in Ingenieurs-Problemen, die ein Hersteller besser als der andere gelöst hat. Für den Konsumenten aber in der Regel schwer bis gar nicht nachzuvollziehen. Bleibt dem Kunden nur noch eine Geschichte zu erzählen, die er auch versteht.

Als Käufer muss man die Gefühle für eine richtige Entscheidung aber zur Seite lassen und eine an Fakten orientierte Entscheidung treffen.  Das sind beim Automobil Verbrauch und Ökobilanz, für Software eignen sich beispielsweise Lizenzkosten, Developer-Velocity, oder messbare Reduzierungen von Support-Aufwänden.

Source: PR für Autos – Das Gewäsch von Volkswagen – Auto & Mobil – Süddeutsche.de

On Digitalised Product Management

Now the family left me here for the afternoon, I have some time to exercise blogging and put down a few thoughts on my recent job. To write in a cosy environment, a lit the fireplace at the house we are staying in. The result is as favourable as you may imagine. Only the missing bear fur could add to the feeling. The role in marketing, “Product Management”, hasn’t been that cosy recently, for a few reasons, that are more related to corporate behaviour than to individual contribution.

While I will need to avoid mentioning the actual product I am still working on, and it’s probably difficult even not to have any references, the below still tries to explain the tensions that exist in the world of traditional industry, moving towards a digitalised service business, in which tangible products get marginalised.

The primary reason for me, an computer engineer, having spent all his life in service business and so to say “in the cloud“, to come to a marketing oriented role is to design and develop – as in business, not as in a computer programming – a connected product.  The Internet of Things, if you want to. Whereas many companies have Things already. But they want to offer smarter things, that’s why everything gets connected. Now connectivity has to offer many benefits over traditional products, but they’re not the primary value proposition the customer pays for. The customer still pays for the product. And in the market, any customer will ask for the smartest product available. Just like I wanted to light a fire. One that was good and warm, and keep my cosy. And to do so, I had to collect some pinecones, that would easily catch fire. It was bothersome, but necessary. 

The things industry is not very familiar with service offerings. It’s actually something fundamentally different from the internet or services industry. To put it boldly, what a customer expects from a product: something solid. And what a customer expects from a service: something that is available anytime. (Like, literally, in the middle of the night!). While Things are sold physically and can be produced on stock, a service cannot be hold until the customer asks for it. Value through a service is created by making something more convenient. I’d have paid somebody to cut and carry the wood required to light a fire. But I had to do it myself, and that was  not only tiring but also heavy work. While, as a customer, the thing I’d buy is the wood, I would spend a premium for somebody to do the work. To add the service. Probably not much, but hey. The same happens for businesses.  While still everybody produces products, the more convenient products are in the customers favour, only at a small margin, though. Just to make an example, just recently Oracle, a business to a majority based on the sales of products, databases, announced to acquire Accenture, a consultancy service, to add services to it’s portfolio. Others have doubts this merger makes sense, exactly for the above reason. Margin driven things companies will have a difficult time appreciating low margin service as part of their portfolio.

Just like me. I wanted to sit in front of a warm fire when spending my time without the family. It’s very clear I’d need pinecones and wood to get that, and I’d pay for it. However, if some other guy selling wood sells cut wood and carries it to my house for a fee, I’d probably appreciate that more convenient offer. But that decision has to be made very conscious, and people responsible for the service in that organisation can’t be measured on financial goals as their product colleagues, but customer satisfaction.

 

 

 

Blah Blah blah … I don't care!

Nice rant every technical person in the industry can relate to.

Blah Blah blah … I don’t care! To hell with your tech marketing bull.

Also:

In tech, filtering signal from noise is a full-time job

True.

via: The Register

Attribution

While visiting the “Techdays Munich: Cyber Security“, the hashtag #6wordcyber was trending on Twitter. And during the talk about a new security law, the following tweet caught my eye:

It is well known in the security community that attribution is hard. Attacks do usually not leave enough evidence to attribute it to a specific group. However, the one reason it really made me think is, because the talk I was listening to was very explicitly avoiding attribution. Which makes any risk to prepare for – and spend money and ressources on – very diffuse and therefore difficult to evaluate for probability.

If a product can safe you from a thread that cannot be identified or quantified, this lacking relationship makes the statement FUD, Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt.