#ProductMonthChallenge

30 Days to a Better PM – That’s the goal of Product School’s #ProductMonthChallange. A different challenge for the entire month of April. Part of the challenge is to share your intentions on social media – like I do with this writing – but you can also follow Instagram. The challenge will start April 1st. That’s two days from now!

Join us for 30 days of learning, growing, and connecting as product people. Download your calendar for your #ProductMonthChallenge!

From the challenge
#ProductChallengeMonth Schedule

ProductMonthChallenge Week One

Day 1: Share Your Intentions on Social Media
Day 2: Write about where you want to be in 10 years time
Day 3: Take the Ultimate Product Trivia Quiz
Day 4: Try out a new product template
Days 5-7: Read a new PM book

ProductMonthChallenge Week Two

Day 8: Write out your mission statement as a product manager
Day 9: Spend 20 minutes learning a new skill
Day 10: Sign up for a webinar
Day 11: Watch a talk on something that interests you
Days 12-14: Try ‘active rest’

ProductMonthChallenge Week Three

Day 15: How would you improve your favorite product?
Day 16: Shoutout a product leader
Day 17: Watch a talk by your favorite company
Day 18: Try a new tool you’ve never used before
Days 19-21: Spend some time away from screens

ProductMonthChallenge Week Four

Day 22: Watch a talk on something new to you
Day 23: Share an insight you’ve learned
Day 24: Listen to a new podcast
Day 25: Sign up for the next big event
Days 26-28: Write an article/blog post

ProductMonthChallenge The Finish Line

Day 29: Meet a teammate for a coffee
Day 30: Reflect on your 30 days

Source: Product School.com

Building a SaaS

Jake Levirne, Senior Director of Product Management at Digital Ocean

Building a product is always for a customer. Developing with this fact in mind helps developers turn their love for technology into more relevant results. Jake Levirne explains the approach for very technical products at Digital Ocean in a small series of videos.

Digital Ocean Blog.

Magic Email

Magic Email

It’s not like email has been a perfect solution ever, to start with. In fact, email has been broken for most of its existence. Imagine all the rules and filters you need to stay on top of your inbox. When Internet became popular, soon spam became popular.

Email lists were usable only before eternal September began. Just the other day somebody at my employer responded to an email list that has thousands of subscribers. And so did everybody else.

Not to mention those emails that come with a good intention and make it past all filters into your inbox. Those typically span many pages and make you feel guilty for not reading because you’re busy.

Admit it, email is broken.

With the advent of new technology, there are new solutions. Magic Email, as announced by Producthunt in it’s weekly newsletter, is something that I’m totally not sure whether it’s an improvement or total troll. Built on GPT-3, that created some bus on the Internet recently, Magic Email allows you to do two things:

a) It will summarize long emails for you. That actually seems to be a good idea for those emails you just couldn’t get around to reading full detail. At least it will tell you whether it’s worth it to invest more time and go into the details buried in long prose.

b) The much more interesting feature it is, that magic email can write text for you. You just give it a bunch of keywords a simple statement and it will extend to a long email. This is exactly that part that makes me wonder whether the product is meant as a troll. Imagine all those guys responding to an email list. Instead of replying “please unsubscribe me”, GPT-3 will write an exhaustive email basically saying the same. The same level of detail will pull much more of your time. Unless you have Magic Email installed yourself of course.

Nevertheless, the product is amazing.

Magic Email is your AI-powered email assistant that summarizes your emails and generates professional emails from brief one-line descriptions. Get through all of your emails 5x faster so you can free up more time for your important work.

From Producthunt

Source: Magic Email – Summarize and generate emails using GPT-3 in one click | Product Hunt

Protect me from what you want – 04.06.

In Softwareprojekten an sich Aufgabe des Scrum Masters gegenüber dem Team und dem Product Owner oder dem allgemeinen Management. Häufig wird die Rolle als “Beschützer des Teams” wahrgenommen. Der Scrum Master soll dem Team helfen, eine realistische Einschätzung Ihrer Fähigkeiten abzugeben und nur Aufgaben zu committen, die realistisch in einem definierten Zeitrahmen geliefert werden können. Unter anderen Aufgaben dient diese dem Zweck, Erwartungshaltungen der Stakeholder zu managen und das Team vor überzogenen Ansprüchen zu schützen. Längerfristig führt das zu einem guten oder besseren Verhältnis zwischen allen Beteiligten, mit einem Vertrauen in gegenseitige Erwartungen und Aufgaben. Ein gutes Verhältnis wiederum hilft dabei, produktiver Software zu schreiben und Mehrwert zu liefern, anstatt Diskussionen zu führen.

Die paar Worte auf einer Fliese in einem Schaufenster beziehen sich mutmaßlich eher auf rein zwischenmenschliche Beziehungen. Dort ist es aber genau so wichtig, sich gegenseitig zu verstehen.

daily photo04.06.2020

Product Management Predictions

Product Management Predictions: With January already over, it’s a bit late for annual forecasts. But then again, looking into the future is a secret superpower every Product Manager should look to develop. Therefore, it’s never too late to have an understanding of what comes up next. Mason Adair of Digital Product People did so for the profession itself.

Product Management Predictions for 2020

Ten Wild Predictions, One True Story and some Solid Career Advice

From the article

Just like the industry is changing. And the article makes an effort to put into relation the different aspects Product Management has. Mason starts his thoughts by looking into public available metrics that indicate the importance and projected relevance related to management of products. In this analysis, related topics range from Agile, Minimum Viable Product, Design Thinking, Lean Startup, Product Market Fit, Rice Prioritisation and Net Promoter Score all the way to Jira, Trello and Asana. With an analysis of how relevance for these topics changed over time, the article goes into setting the scenes for professional trends that influenced the past years. These include economic environment, the introduction of new technology, a demographic shift, increasing societal fragmentation and climatic change.

Product Management Predictions shape the conclusion in his article: 10 wild predictions I believe are not that wild. The top most prediction, Product arriving at the C-Level, is almost no prediction anymore. Digital companies already have recognised the importance to actively influence direction towards customers.

Read more: The Future of Product Management in the 2020s – Mason Adair – Medium

Product First Step Feedback: Having worked in customer facing roles most of my career, I have experienced first hand how important it is for clients to get quick impressions of a product. Opportunities to leave that impression are often limited.

The other night, a colleague argued most products don’t even need a UI. And a UI won’t even be necessary for products that aim at developers as their audience. It may be unnecessary for specific, complex products. And in general, I won’t disagree. Such products exist and still require a good first impression. Browsing open source directories at Github, popular projects come with good documentation. A readme.md that comes with building and running instruction.

GitHub - Product Feedback
GitHub

In the IaaS/PaaS/SaaS world, popular tools come with first step tutorials. Quick tours to get potential users started in minutes. Google apparently made this a release requirement, since virtually all products ship with a “Get Started in 5 Minutes” section to start with.

When I came into the product management role, I was a strong proponent of UI driven products. In hindsight, this believe was driven by the pure marketing thought of it. A UI shows better at trade fair booths than a terminal.

With more technical products, the readme is the last resort. And with that, an opportunity to gather feedback is gone. The UI can implement tracking and analysis to build a feedback channel for Product Managers to understand how the new feature actually is perceived.

In the software, provided it is delivered in source, the first step that could possible send telemetry, is the build process. And to drive adoption, you have to offer the customer a good first impression in documentation, before he can build your component. Should the documentation not deliver on this first step, you lost a customer even before he saw the product. If you are in the situation to receive feedback on this first impression, take that very serious.