The Mind at Work: Guido van Rossum on how Python makes thinking in code easier

Python, the programming language, gained lot’s of popularity only in the past decade. In particular for big data applications, machine learning and data science the language is almost without alternative. But also for tool development or web applications backends, Python has huge adoption. Reasons are it’s huge ecosystem and a friendly, constructive community. Despite it’s newer competitors it has been around for 30 years. One of the most appreciated benefits is the steep learning curve, that allows virtually everyone to understand Python code.

Dropbox has an interview with Guido van Rossum, who published the first version of the language in 1989. The conversation revolves around the purpose of code and how python helps improve cooperation and productivity.

Guido van Rossum
Guido van Rossum

“You primarily write your code to communicate with other coders, and, to a lesser extent, to impose your will on the computer.”

Guido van Rossum

A conversation with the creator of the world’s most popular programming language on removing brain friction for better work. Source: The Mind at Work: Guido van Rossum on how Python makes thinking in code easier

Async / Await with Python

Asynchronous programming with Python, explained.

On Realpython, to read.

Once again, here on LivePython. Sometimes it’s better to listen.

Go best practices

Peter Bourgon has some experience with go, and he shares this on his website. Go is a language developed at Google 2007 and released to the public in 2009. In first place, this is fairly unrelated, but we’re currently evaluating go as a language for an IoT project, which makes it fit the topic of this blog.

Even though go does a great job providing a newbie with an environment to get started, there are experiences you can avoid making, listening to somebody that did it before.

via: Go best practices, six years in

Haskell and the Future of Coding

Haskell is a 25-year-old programming language that isn’t all that popular. But Facebook uses it, and that’s a sign of things to come.

Wow. Not for a single day in the past 18 years did I even remotely think Haskell had a future. Even more with fancy hipster languages like, Ruby (not so much anymore), Scala, Groove, Erlang or even Clojure showing up, in commercial environments. Facebook is proving me wrong.

via: Facebook’s New Spam-Killer Hints at the Future of Coding | WIRED

Spectrum 2015 Programming Languages

New languages enter the scene, and big data makes its mark

Spoiler: basically, all is the same as past year, but R made a jump up by 4 positions and ranks 6th now. R is a statistical language, capable of munging huge amounts of data, hence the Big Data reference in the article.

via: Spectrum

Software Engineers Will Work One Day for English Majors

“Many programmers find that their employability starts to decline at about age 35.”

No Shit, Bloomberg: Software Engineers Will Work One Day for English Majors.