Third-Party API Economy.

The Third-Party API Economy
Image: Grace Isford

How to Give Your Users Superpowers

Application Programming Interfaces, or APIs, thrive and give companies an edge for focusing on very specific issues. While the pattern has been around sind the early 2000s, the ecosystem only started to develop this rapidly recently.

Only to make an example, Twilio started their service as an API only offering. The problem the company solves is basically notification. On all channels, mainly texting and calling. Which by itself is pretty complex, compared to what the involving party actually wants to achieve. Twilio is wrapping this functionality to allow their customers take advantage of telecommunication.

Grace Isford made an effort to classify vendors in the market, that follow similar patterns. The criteria for the selection in his chart are:

  • The product reduces complexity
  • The company provides Business Critical Functionality
  • It takes advantage of a technological shift
  • And finally a community factor

The entire sector is currently exploding and it’s difficult to keep track. Specialised services, consumable through Web-APIs become a commodity for at least developers. Grace Isfords chart gives a good overview of the current situation, along with some criteria to consider the offering.

Source: The Third-Party API Economy. How to Give Your Users Superpowers | by Grace Isford | Sep, 2020 | Medium

‘We’ve created a privacy industry’

‘We’ve created a privacy industry’ was a statement you could often hear when Europe introduced General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and the German implementation DatenSchutz GrundVerOrdnung (DSGVO). Already back in 2016 first predictions arrived, that GDPR will boost European software industry and give them a unique selling point. After the regulation became effective in Europe May 25th 2018(!), after a 2 years transition period, perceived only complaints happened. Affected data controllers and processors cited the difficulties implementing these regulations. A BitKom funded survey even indicates the regulation is hurting the European market.

'We've created a privacy industry'
Panel on Internet Security and Privacy

Now, around 1.5years later, the industry seems to have settled on the regulation and business continues as usual. Subjectively perceived, privacy is indeed still an obstacle to decision makers in the market. Even politicians keep on imploring data to be the new oil, demanding a data driven economy and to weakend the underlying ideas of european data protection acts. Meanwhile, the opportunity has moved along. Californian Start-Ups discovered this niche and turn privacy it into value:

Privacy-focused technology companies are offering a variety of services, from personal data scrubbing to business-focused software meant to help companies comply with the law.

Source: ‘We’ve created a privacy industry’: California law fuels wave of startups

Tech layoffs spread (a bit)

Are January layoffs just a few post-WeWork jitters? TechCrunch has found itself writing about layoffs at a few notable tech companies this week — and not just Softbank-backed ones. The focus is very much profits, as Alex Wilhelm summed up on Thursday, especially after the failed WeWork IPO and subsequent valuation and headcount decimation. We’ll […]

From the article

Not only more Female Founders, but also more successful Female Founders, measured by unicorns, have entered the startup universe. Those are companies that passed the $1 billion in valuation. Crunchbase, the leading platform for professionals to discover innovative companies, has the data:

Crunchbase data shows what ‘overperforming’ really means: 2019 has been a historic year for female-founded unicorns, which were born at an unprecedented pace.

Idea meets Market

Unternehmensgründung gehört im Spätkapitalismus ja zum guten Ton, Startup ist eine Szene in der man in ist, wenn man drin ist. Das die Realität häufig härter ist, liest man ja meistens nur in den unteren Teilen der Berichterstattung. Sehr schön fasst das Video, das vergangene Woche auf Facebook aufgetaucht ist, den Prozess von der Idee über den Businessplan und Angel-Money bis zum Markteintritt zusammen.

Here's What Real 3D Touch Looks Like | WIRED

With all the advertisements from Apple about their 3D touch technology, virtually everybody that actually got their hands on the devices was somewhat disappointed with the advancement. There must be options beyond peek and pop, and startup Qeexos develops this real 3D touch technology. Wired has an article on the possibilities.

You may soon be able to do a lot more than swipe, tap, peek, and pop—FingerAngle promises to turn your gadget’s screens into 3D environments.

via: WIRED

Don't aim for disruptive

DisruptiveThe tech industry is optimizing everything around us, disrupting every aspect of social, business or whatsoever. The thought everything will be easier is just so tempting to everybody remotely involved in anything remotely digital. And that’s why so many app-developers, start-ups, evangelists feel inspired by the opportunity. Every new idea needs to be ground breaking, revolutionizing. And that’s why that concept of “disruptive” became so popular, even while interpreted fundamentally wrong by this group of technologists.  Clayton M. Christensen who coined the term, explored development of disk drives and described generational change in the technology, each disrupting the market of the previous generation.Winter Wonder Land However, none of the following generations of disk drives was designed as “disruptive“, but to have advantages over the previous one.

Infografik: Warum Startups scheitern

Sehr schöne Analyse, warum 11 von 12 Startups scheitern. Hauptgrund, schenkt man dieser Analyse Glauben, ist zu frühes Wachstum. Irgendwie kommt aus der Grafik aber nicht raus, ob es für die Idee des gescheiterten Unternehmens überhaupt einen hinreichenden Markt gab oder ob dort nur Geld verbrannt wurde.  

via Kaffeepause: Warum Startups scheitern | Gründerszene.