Categories
Security & Privacy

Contact tracing.

Health Officials Say ‘No Thanks’ to Contact-Tracing Tech“, titles Wired. In all these recent debates about how to handle Covid-19 going forward, in particular in Germany, it may be worthwhile looking beyond borders.

Later last month, Engadget reported, that Israel stops phone tracing to enforce Corona quaranties. While Israel seemed to look at phone location information, the Wired article suggests multiple US states and cities evaluated the benefit of other contact tracing technology. The result seems to disappoint:

States like New York, California, and Massachusetts, and cities like Baltimore and San Francisco, have looked carefully at cutting-edge contact-tracing solutions and largely said, “No thanks,” or “Not now.”

via wired.

Foreign perspective is an interesting one, too. Foreign Policy titles “Germany’s Angst Is Killing Its Coronavirus Tracing App“. Which, after all, may be the exact outcome.

Corona

Categories
Uncategorized

Reading recommendations

When a dear friend asked for my reading list today, I didn’t have a proper answer beyond all of what is on my nightstand. There are still „5000 Jahre Schulden“ (David Graeber), „Machine, Platform, Crowd“ (Andrew McAfee  (Autor), Erik Brynjolfsson (Autor)), „The Heretic’s Guide to Global Finance: Hacking the Future of Money“ (Brett Scott) and „Die drei Sonnen“ (Cixin Liu) left, but the list is empty beyond that.

While I spent my time split in half between the weekend newspaper and a lake, I did some very quick research and came across Wired‘s 13 reading recommendations for this fall, that all seem to be worth a closer look.

Categories
Internet & Cloud

The Internet rules the Mobile World Congress.

The Internet rules the Mobile World Congress. Writes Wired. Which is consequent, looking at the development of mobile technology and sales of devices.

Slowing smartphone sales and metro strikes aren’t enough to get anyone down at the 16th annual Mobile World Congress.

via: WIRED

Categories
Internet & Cloud

Haskell and the Future of Coding

Haskell is a 25-year-old programming language that isn’t all that popular. But Facebook uses it, and that’s a sign of things to come.

Wow. Not for a single day in the past 18 years did I even remotely think Haskell had a future. Even more with fancy hipster languages like, Ruby (not so much anymore), Scala, Groove, Erlang or even Clojure showing up, in commercial environments. Facebook is proving me wrong.

via: Facebook’s New Spam-Killer Hints at the Future of Coding | WIRED