DuckDuckGo calls out Google for spying on users.

When Apple introduced labels in their app store to indicate which data an app would link to user information it created transparency for many. Only Google seemed to stop on moving forward and did not publish new versions of its apps. Until recently. Now that they are updated, DuckDuckGo, a search engine advocating privacy in the digital age, calls out the abundant use of personal data.

Nithin Coca of The Next Web went on a quest to quitting Google. In this article, he describes his experience and gives plenty of pointers on how to achieve the same. He start out making a point about individual privacy, and points out individual alternatives to popular Google services. Starting from using Firefox over Chrome to particular services for daily office use. At the end of the year, this little “Quitting Google” guide contains little news, but serves as a good starting point to maybe develop a new years resolution and be more sensitive about privacy in the upcoming year 2020.

Nithin Coca of The Next Web
Nithin Coca of The Next Web

Over the past six months, I have gone on a surprisingly tough, time-intensive, and enlightening quest — to quit using, entirely, the products of just one company — Google. What should be a simple task was, in reality, many hours of research and testing. But I did it. Today, I am Google-free, part of the […]

Source: How I fully quit Google (and you can, too)

The new Edge browser, built on the same open source code as Google Chrome, contains a new Tracking Prevention feature that blocks third-party trackers and, at the Strict setting, many ads. My tests show that one in four items blocked are from Google.

Source: Edge vs. Chrome: Microsoft’s Tracking Prevention hits Google the hardest